Maybe it is okay not to be grateful all the time.

It could be worse.

There are people who go to bed hungry every night.

You are lucky, look at all the things you have.

All of the above statements are so very true. Almost all the problems pale in comparison to someone having to live day-in-day-out in hunger. Perhaps, if we were to make a priority list of all the problems humanity has to solve, eradicating hunger should be on the top of the list. Let us say we manage to provide a person living in perpetual hunger with a life where they will never have to be poor or hungry again, would gratefulness be the only thing they then feel their whole life?  Would they be able to get through all the heartbreaking instances of life with that one thought of at least I am not poor anymore? I am grateful that I never had to experience poverty, more grateful than I could ever express through writing. But am I then allowed to be discontented about certain other things?  Racism? Homophobia? Rampant mental health stigma? Sexism?

For me, when I am one hundred percent grateful about something it’s because I like the way the thing or situation is, in other words, I would not want it to change. But there are many things about me that I would like to change and it usually makes me very guilty that I am not always grateful about life.

I got an opportunity to live and study abroad about four years ago, all of my friends and family were very happy for me. A lot of people sent me messages saying they were proud of my achievements. After I finished the master’s program I was offered a PhD position in a national space agency, but then nobody was happy nor proud of me. Because I was 27 years old and marriage should have been the next logical step in my life. The messages I received told me something along the lines of, think of all the girls who did not get an opportunity to go to school at all, here you got the opportunity to study in a foreign country, now that is enough, get married. Yes, I was thankful to have had an amazing opportunity to study at one of the world’s best engineering institutions but was I then wrong to have been discontented about being forced to make a decision I did not want to?

atleastitisntworse
Found here

You know what, I was not.

This argument of always be grateful is usually made in mental health related discussions quite a lot, wherein depression is said as a lack of gratitude. Most of the times it comes from a well-meaning place. The intention might be to make someone aware that everything isn’t as bad as they think it is and there is still hope. But that one phrase dismisses a person’s right to feel bad, and nobody should have to earn their right to feel bad. Now I know how privileged I was to have had an insurance that paid my stay at a psychiatric ward and to have a group of friends who took care of me like family in a foreign country- my mental health is stable enough to appreciate those facts now but it didn’t help to hear it back then.

When someone is going through pain might not be the best time to remind them to be grateful. There is a time to do it when they are better able to appreciate the whole picture, when they have gotten some space from their pain, when they are able to be rational and logical about it, when they can grab a yellow legal pad and make a pro and con list.

Gratitude and discontent can exist hand in hand. We can be thankful about something and discontented about something else. Maybe the magic is finding that balance and it is something we can learn and practice. It always helps to appreciate the big picture and sometimes even to write down all the things that are good in our lives so that we don’t forget them but it is okay not to be like that all the time. Last time I checked we haven’t yet turned to robots, and as long as we have a beating heart we are going to be not grateful from time to time and that is OKAY!

I will leave you with a quote that I absolutely love

gaiman-discontent

Hugs

Jo

Footnote: Madelyn left a comment and I thought it is important to share it here.

YES! “Gratitude and discontent can exist hand in hand.” Important point and great post.

Those “positivity purveyors” have missed the point of gratitude entirely, IMHO. It’s not designed to be denial’s handmaiden. It’s a technique for helping us weather our storms by encouraging us to focus on what we *can* be grateful for – *after* we’ve acknowledged the fact that sometimes things just suck (without measuring it by degrees in comparison to anyone else challenges and sorrows).

AND, it is not kind in the slightest to attempt to drag somebody over the positivity line when what s/he needs is a loving ear to listen while she pours her heart out. It’s not THEIR job to remind you to be grateful – you’ll get to that all by yourself when the time is right – if they’d only commiserate or be silent.

Would they overstep a mother’s grief after the death of a child, encouraging her to be grateful for the ones she has left because some people aren’t even able to conceive? SAME THING.
xx,
mgh
(Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
– ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
“It takes a village to educate a world!”

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15 thoughts on “Maybe it is okay not to be grateful all the time.

  1. It can be hard to see the bright side when someone is in pain. You are right to say that it may not be the best time to remind someone of being grateful despite being depressed. It’s not entirely true that ungratefulness is the cause. Each one of us have own battles to fight and you can’t compare it. In my experience, those that I’ve expected to be happy for me and my choices were eventually the ones who burst my bubble by telling me to do this or that because of culture and my age. It may not seem much, but it’s actually part of the pain I’m dealing and I’m not sorry for overthinking about it and feeling it. I am still grateful for many things and I show it everyday, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You made very good points here brain, when people that are close to us do not share our joys and excitements it might be hard to enjoy it to the fullest. I can really understand what the weight of cultural expectations can do to us, it’s not always easy to see through clearly because it is all meddled up in care and love. Good day

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Sorry for the late reply Indira. It was a difficult post to write because this is an unpopular opinion. But glad that you saw my point 🙂 Thanks for reading and commenting

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I think one has to learn how to stop and smell the roses. Unless your days are numbered most of us take life for granted to some degree. Standing outside yourself helps you see yourself and the beauty that surrounds us. Instead of feeling grateful maybe feeling present…is a better state…be well …keep writing…it’s seems to be your way of being present…and connecting to those of us that love to hear your thoughts..

    Liked by 1 person

  3. YES! “Gratitude and discontent can exist hand in hand.” Important point and great post.

    Those “positivity purveyors” have missed the point of gratitude entirely, IMHO. It’s not designed to be denial’s handmaiden. It’s a technique for helping us weather our storms by encouraging us to focus on what we *can* be grateful for – *after* we’ve acknowledged the fact that sometimes things just suck (without measuring it by degrees in comparison to anyone else challenges and sorrows).

    AND, it is not kind in the slightest to attempt to drag somebody over the positivity line when what s/he needs is a loving ear to listen while she pours her heart out. It’s not THEIR job to remind you to be grateful – you’ll get to that all by yourself when the time is right – if they’d only commiserate or be silent.

    Would they overstep a mother’s grief after the death of a child, encouraging her to be grateful for the ones she has left because some people aren’t even able to conceive? SAME THING.
    xx,
    mgh
    (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMore dot com)
    – ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder –
    “It takes a village to educate a world!”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was really curious to know your take on this Madelyn and thank you so much for taking the time to comment on this. I am going to go ahead and add this reply of yours as a footnote to the post if you don’t mind. It breaks my heart sometimes to see this pervasive comparison of ‘who has it worse?’ and ‘Be grateful’ has become sort of a bumper sticker motivational quote that is supposed to magically make all of us feel better. I remember watching some TED talks that were inching around this theme and I couldn’t agree with completely. Hope we discuss this topic in more depth in future. xx

      Liked by 1 person

  4. My point exactly… I used to get irritated with the fact, and used to talk back. I have learnt to understand the hypocrisy where we are discouraged to compare ourselves with anyone in any other situation and then asked to compare our blessings with others in the matters of gratitude. Great post, lovely thoughts!

    Like

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